Internet standards for HTML

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is standardizing over 100 specifications for the open web, in at least 13 working groups. The CSS Working Group alone is in charge of 50 specifications. This does not include work on Unicode, HTTP and TLS.

New tag proposal.  Not really.

The nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from

I was waiting to post this until the debate between W3C and WHATWG about the status of HTML5 scope was resolved. However, I have waited since February 2011. Consensus is that HTML5 is being inappropriately used as a catch-all for every standard supported by modern browsers. Modern browsers actually include much more: CSS3 styling, WOFF (web fonts), semantic web elements such as microformats, 3-D graphics including SVG, and performance enhancements. HTML5 tags are merely one part of semantic web support. As a result, terminology was modified by WHATWG. HTML is the new HTML5(more…)

Published in: on November 15, 2011 at 4:25 am  Comments (1)  
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PDF history and something special from Adobe

Part One: PDF history 

PDF is a formal open standard, ISO 32000. It was invented by Adobe Systems 17 years ago.

PDF = Portable Document Format

PDF history by Adobe

History of the PDF by Adobe Systems

The image links to a pleasant interactive timeline of Adobe Systems and its role in the development of the PDF. The chronology is in Flash, and thankfully free of any video or audio. Read more about Adobe Systems role in the history of PDF file development.

PDF files are more versatile than I realized, and

  • are viewable and printable on Windows®, Mac OS, and mobile platforms e.g. Android™
  • can be digitally signed
  • preserve source file information — text, drawings, video, 3D, maps, full-color graphics, photos — regardless of the application used to create them

Additional PDF file types exist, including PDF/A, PDF/E and U3D. All are supported by Adobe software.  (more…)

Published in: on September 5, 2011 at 7:30 pm  Comments (3)  
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Aspire to Chrome OS Netbook

Is this the new Chrome OS Netbook by Acer?

Is this the new Chrome O/S making an arrival via Acer Aspire?

According to DailyTech, the first Chrome OS Netbooks are on their way, and to be expected as soon as next month, presumably December 2010. Does that mean that the Google Chrome operating system (O/S) will come bundled with only certain brands of PC’s, such as Acer, and the Acer Aspire One, depicted above? I don’t have an alternative solution, not initially. It certainly would be nice to switch between operating systems with the same ease that one can choose between browsers, while continuing to use the same physical hardware.

At the moment, I can combine Windows 7 with any of IE8, Firefox or Chrome with the greatest of ease. It remains for the imagination to see a future where I can just as easily change the O/S, e.g. start with Windows 7 and Google Chrome browser, then select Google Chrome O/S while retaining Google Chrome Browser. Finally, imagine running the Chrome O/S using either IE 8.0 or Opera browsers!

And please put aside any questions along the lines of, “But WHY would anyone want to do such a thing?” I confess, I have no answer for that at the moment.

Photo Credit: Acer Aspire One with Chrome O/S via DailyTech

Published in: on November 3, 2010 at 12:41 pm  Comments (1)  
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Disciplined Browsing with Chrome Extension

Too many tabs

Have you ever tried having 100 or more tabs open at once in Google Chrome browser? You can’t even see the favicon of the tabs, not to mention the tab titles! It can really be a drain on your productivity, hunting around for those tabs. Consider this Chrome browser extension, TooManyTabs for better tab management and reduced tab overflow. TooManyTabs (TMT) stores up to 20 recently closed tabs.

Here’s a video demonstrating use of TMT.

No more tabs

For truly advanced tabaholics, there is a stricter alternative to TMT. No More Tabs only allows a maximum of six tabs to be open at any one time.


Sadly, the developers of TMT decided to stop supporting it in July 2016. Although the following commentary is specific to the Firefox version of TMT, there have been no updates regarding support of Google Chrome browser tab management on the Visibo blog either.  After eight years, the end arrives for TMT and other browser add-on’s:

Here are some of my final thoughts as a developer…

TMT is small, but developing it has never been easy. So why persist? For a tabaholic like me I have always too many tabs open. TMT offers a niche function that could only be appreciated by few people who really needs it like I do. They would email me about how TMT had improved their productivity and how devastated they would be without it. I am proud that I have served the many minority of us whose need were not met by the “standard”.

It seems all traditional add ons have also become too niche to be worth supporting. In my opinion, the Internet and the Open Source movement has kind of lost its original ways. If my memory serves, the Internet promised a long tail. Everyone, supposedly, can find their niche on the Internet when there is none in the real world. The Internet now, however, is too becoming more and more tailored to the sole interest of the majority, where popularity… is the sole criteria of survival… If you are a niche, like TMT, or like Google Reader, you will no longer get support. Maybe it’s because it’s not profitable. Or compared to the billions of other users on the Internet, that 0.1% of you aren’t important.

I do not like the direction that we are heading.

Loyal users of TMT: Thank you for your long time support and farewell! It has been a great time.

Undisciplined browsing in the wild

Via Google Product Forums, this user is having trouble with slow Chrome tab switching on Android:

First of all I must admit I’m not a normal user here, I have like 400 tabs open…

Published in: on August 13, 2010 at 12:58 am  Leave a Comment  
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